Skip to content

Bon Weekend!

October 28, 2011

Bon Weekend tout le Monde!

{…now get outta here and go play…}

Ignacio Torres

Margareth Doorduin

October 28, 2011

The subjects of Margareth Doorduin’s anonymous portraits tell disquieting emotional narratives through the manipulation of their posture. 

“Instead of directly trying to identify the person on the picture, what we naturally tend to do, I want people to look beyond that. It is not about what you recognize, but about what you do not see, and only can feel and experience”

Margareth Doorduin

Lukasz Wierzbowski

October 20, 2011

Faceless beauties hedged in by the verdant landscape, masked by their flowing locks, and literally obscured by floral patterns are the subjects of Lukasz Wierzbowski’s photographs.

Lukasz Wierzbowski

Agnes Thor

October 18, 2011

Atmospheric effects enshroud the subjects of Agnes Thor’s photography.  Her subjects signify the effects of wind and the weather, characterizing all of the ways in which a season bends us, edits our movements, our language, and even our breath.

Agnes Thor

Maia Akiva Photography

October 17, 2011

In a blur of watery springtime, diluted sunlight sighs over the staccato surface of an aqua pool laden with moist blossoms & gorged pods.

Maia Akiva

Bon Weekend | Tout le Monde

October 14, 2011

Zinnentuimel | a tumbling of the senses;

the intoxication, confusion or ecstasy caused by heightened sensory stimulation

Sonja Vordermaier

Olaf Brzeski

October 14, 2011

Divided throughout the 19th century, invaded and occupied by the Nazi regime during the Second World War, and subsequently hidden behind the Iron Curtain for decades,Polandbecame a democracy in 1989.  In response to this succession of oppressive regimes, a culture of resistance to order imposed from outside has flourished.  Polish artists like Olaf Brzeski responded to the violence and chaos of past events with art that reconstructs reality using elements of the fantastic and absurd.

“I was born in Breslau, which was a German city before war and then we got it back.  I have the influence of my grandparents, their experience with concentration camps and the city, dark and sinister, with tunnels and bunkers.  This sparked my imagination.”

Olaf Brzeski